Monday, June 15, 2015

Weird cat behavior: Is it kneading or something else?

strange cat behavior explained

Ever since I brought him home, Troy has been unusually attached to me. It's not too surprising, then, that he'd have a little trouble with my absences. When I was gone at BlogPaws for close to a week, he went on a bit of a hunger strike, and he did a little overgrooming, too, and ended up with a few little bald spots.

All of that was bad, but it was easy enough to handle. With a little bit of special food and some TLC, I got him eating again and I kept his self-mutilation stuff to a minimum.

But then something else happened.

Once or twice per day, in the week or so after I got home from the conference, Troy did this weird little happy dance.



It starts with basic kneading and marching. But then, the back end of this cat goes into motion. See the weird tail pulsing and bent knees? I've never seen a cat do this before.

I did a bunch of searches, and there are dozens of us out there with cats that do this. Often, these cats are rescues, and they're overwhelmingly male. Most people who see this had the same "WTF?!?!" reaction that I did, and most people had no idea what was going on.

Thankfully, my lovely Facebook fans had a suggestion. They told me to flip him over, mid-dance, and look for unusual kitten parts.

Bingo!

This is a weird cat-humping thing, it seems. When this cat is dancing, he's also having a little kitty sex episode.

I'm no prude, and I am accustomed to this kind of animal behavior. I live with a very active male pug, after all, and he's destroyed dozens of toys with his evening antics. It's something that animals do, and it's not typically a problem unless it causes some sort of health issue for the pet.

Liam, for example, can develop skin irritations from doing this sort of thing too often. So, when I see him get interested in something, I whisk it away and redirect with a treat. Easy peasy.

Troy, thankfully, doesn't seem to have any sort of health problem from this behavior. And (also thankfully), he's not all that interested in doing it anymore. Now that I've been home for more than a week, he seems a little more accustomed to me, and a little less overwhelmed with emotion.

But I'm curious: Anyone out there have amorous kitties like this? Do you stop them, and if so, why? Love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

8 comments:

  1. Kind of funny, as long as not dangerous/unhealthy. I have not seen Kilo the Pug do it at all and my rescue girl cat Nala (she passed last year at 17) did not do it either. Have a great week. X Susie and Kilo the Pug

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kilo is an awesome name for a pug, BTW. Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  2. Yes, Newton does this every single night. On the head peep right after she lays down for bed. If he continues, he will try to bite, especially if she has on long sleeves, probably to simulate biting the nape of a female's neck. He doesn't like being petted during this behavior at all, so that usually discourages it before he starts biting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, with biting? Watch those fingers!

      Delete
  3. We had a cat named Tommy who did some of this, too ...usually to a blanket or sweater and not to another cat or any of the human family members. For the most part, we just tried to ignore it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It does seem to be a private activity. Ignoring might be the right call, in some cases.

      Delete
  4. my husband's cat Kit does this ALL.THE.TIME.. it is super annoying. She started doing it on a round cat bed we had, and she went in circles. We now have a bed spread that is the same sort of texture and she does it all over the bed. well his side of the bed. the spread is actually ruined on his side because it catches in her claws..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, man! You have a little whirling addict!

      Delete