Wednesday, February 24, 2016

Wordless Wednesday: Keep your dogs safe among the roses

Liam the pug poses in the rose bed
Spring is totally here. Just ask my dogs, or look at my roses. The weather is warm enough that Liam and Sinead both enjoy their daily walks, and everywhere we look, roses are sprouting their leaves.

Roses are a big deal in Oregon, as the climate here is neither too cold in the winter nor too hot in the summer. Anyone with even the merest hint of a green thumb can grow a pretty darn perfect rose. But, it often takes a lot of chemicals to make roses pest free.

Sinead the Boston terrier in the rose bed
I use a systemic fertilizer on my roses about four times per year, and that stuff is pretty toxic to dogs. That's why the roses in the backyard are up high in planters the dogs can't access. And since I'm sure my neighbors use some kind of fertilizer on their roses, I ensure that Liam and Sinead aren't allowed to visit the roses we walk by on our strolls through the neighborhood.

But, I see plenty of people who let their dogs sniff, lick and otherwise pester growing rose bushes. That's flirting with disaster. I've gotten around it in the past by building big pens (see a rant about that here), but this year, I'll probably just use signs.

So this week's Wordless Wednesday comes with a safety reminder: Look for pesticide signs when you have your dogs out and about, and if you don't see those warnings, assume chemicals are in play and keep your dogs away!
Liam and Sinead posing with the roses
See the stink eye? No photo shoot would be complete without it.
Thanks to BlogPaws for hosting this always entertaining blog hop. And please leave me a comment, so I'll know you were here!

9 comments:

  1. Lovely pics! Lucky you (& your wee dogs) that spring has sprung. It certainly hasn't here in west of Scotland. Roses over here have adapted to grow under water! ;)

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  2. A good reminder to be careful. We don't see all that many rose bushes here in So Cal - they need too much water for us with our drought conditions. Of course, some folks have them, but low water plants are becomming a lot more popular here. (Jealous that you are having spring - it's so hot here right now it feels like summer! Nutty weather.)

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    1. Roses can be total water hogs, you're right. I get around it, to some degree, with rainwater barrels. One good rain fills them right up, and I use that to sprinkle water on the roses. But I've torn out a ton of other plans that needed too much TLC, and I replaced them with easy and drought-resistant lavender. I'm hoping we ALL get more rain this summer!

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  3. Great advice! Roses are gorgeous and it's too easy to admire their beauty and not think about any fertilizers or pesticide sprays that may have been used. There's also the issue of dogs walking on other people's lawns that may have just put down fertilizer or insecticides.

    Thanks for the great reminder to think about what we sometimes can't see.

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    1. You make a good point. It's grass fertilizer season here, too. I keep seeing the tell-tale white sprinkles on the sidewalk!

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  4. Very good reminders. People are never thinking about the chemicals. I've never had my back yard fertilized because of it. Just the front yard where no dogs go.

    WOOF!

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    1. That sounds like a good plan. I try to keep the chemicals to a minimum all around the yard, but I am especially careful in back where the dogs loll.

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